Carnivorous plants



Carnivorous plants are a group that tend to be attractive to the collector rather than the general gardener. Yet many of us have tried growing at least one carnivorous plant - "tried" being the important word here.

It's hoped to bring you more information about sucessfully growing these plants in Queensland in the future. Meanwhile, consider joining a carnivorous plant society for more information as well as shows, displays, meetings, outings or plant sales. Also, check below for links.

If you operate a specialist carnivorous plant nursery supplying Qld, please get in touch about advertising on this page (Information for advertisers).

More Online Information


You'll find plenty of information about these fascinating plants on the internet. Here are a few links to get you started:
Carnivorous plants N.C. State University, North Carolina
Carnivorous Plants: New Ornamentals in Chronica Horticulturae, December 2008, International Society for Horticultural Science (PDF)
Carnivorous plants of South Africa from Veld & Flora, the Botanical Society of South Africa
Venus Flytrap Care tips. Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture
The Pitcher Plant Project Sarracenia Addiction
Sarracenia purpurea Fire Effects Information System, USDA Forest Service
Sarracenia minor Fire Effects Information System, USDA Forest Service
Meadowview Biological Research Station Their mission includes saving endagered pitcher plant bogs of Maryland and Virginia
Sundews from Veld & Flora, the Botanical Society of South Africa
The Cape Sundew - Drosera capensis: know it and grow it from Veld & Flora, the Botanical Society of South Africa
Galleria Carnivora Photography of carnivorous plants

Misspellings: carnivourous plants, carnivorous palnts, carnivouros plants


Older news items


Another type of insect-dependency by carnivorous plant
A symbiotic relationship between a carnivorous plant an insect has been discovered on Borneo. Ants living with Nepenthes bicalcarata appear to help the plant by assisting with the capturing and digestion of prey, with nutrients being passed on to the plants in the ants' wastes. The pitchers alone are inefficient and without ants the plants become nutrient stressed. In turn, the plant provides a specialised structure (domatia) for the ants to live in, and nectar for them to eat in addition to the insect prey they help catch. Original paper here: A Carnivorous Plant Fed by Its Ant Symbiont: A Unique Multi-Faceted Nutritional Mutualism (May 2012)

Another type of insect-dependency by carnivorous plant
A symbiotic relationship between a carnivorous plant an insect has been discovered on Borneo. Ants living with Nepenthes bicalcarata appear to help the plant by assisting with the capturing and digestion of prey, with nurients being passed on to the plants in the ants' wastes. The pitchers alone are inefficient and without ants the plants become nutrient stressed. In turn, the plant provides a specialised structure (domatia) for the ants to live in, and nectar for them to eat in addition to the insect prey they help catch. Original paper here: A Carnivorous Plant Fed by Its Ant Symbiont: A Unique Multi-Faceted Nutritional Mutualism (May 2012)

Pitcher plant could revolutionise housework
Inspired by the slippery surface of a pitcher plant's trap, scientists have developed a material that repells a wide range of liquids and solids, even under harsh conditions. It has potential in a wide range of medical and industrial applications, including self-cleaning windows and anti-graffiti coatings. Source: Slippery slope:Researchers take advice from a carnivorous plant (September 2011)

When is a plant "carnivorous"?
UK scientists are exploring notions of what consitutues a carnivorous plant in a review paper Murderous plants: Victorian Gothic, Darwin and modern insights into vegetable carnivory. Common plants that can trap insects in sticky hairs, for example, may benefit from the nutrients released when the insects eventually break down. These might be considered partly carnivorous. Read more at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew website: Scientists think 'Killer Petunias' should join the rank of carnivorous plants (Dec 2009)
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